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Goodtime Saturday Double Bill

Larkin Poe
Police Dog Hogan

Atlanta, Georgia’s Larkin Poe are a kicking Americana roots-rock band fronted by Rebecca and Megan Lovell, who with their sister Jessica performed as The Lovell Sisters before going on to work with Elvis Costello, Conor Oberst and T-Bone Burnett. Rebecca and Megan formed Larkin Poe – named after their ancestor, a cousin of Edgar Allan Poe – in 2010 and last year were voted ‘Best Discovery of Glastonbury’ by The Observer. They are going to be stars.

The great value double-bill is opened by Guardian-readers’ favourites Police Dog Hogan a fabulously entertaining Americana/folk/bluegrass band whose banjo player/co-vocalist is Weekend columnist Tim Dowling. Their very collectable merchandise now includes tote-bags and t-shirts as well as tea- towels, and you can check their video for ‘West Country Boy’ below.  “This band are bloody good”. MAVERICK MAGAZINE (On Police Dog Hogan)

Weekend Ticket available for St George’s Bristol events (Saving £5)

Discount will apply automatically when tickets for both days are in the basket.

 

BAW

 

 

Larkin Poe – Kin (Album Teaser)

 

Police Dog Hogan – Fraserburgh Train

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Blues & Bluegrass Double Bill

Mud Morganfield
The Coal Porters

Chicago blues singer and songwriter Mud Morganfield is the eldest son of legendary bluesman Muddy Waters. He’s recognised as one of the best, toughest and most authentic figures on the contemporary blues scene, mixing his own songs with classics from the traditional urban blues repertoire associated with his father. He’s appeared with Buddy Guy, Kim Wilson of the Fabulous Thunderbirds and actor/musician Hugh Laurie, and today is accompanied by his regular band of piano, harmonica, guitar, double bass and drums, as seen on ‘Later With Jools Holland’.

The show is opened by The Coal Porters, ex-Long Ryder and country-rock luminary Sid Griffin’s “alternative” (they do David Bowie’s ‘Heroes’ and Bob Dylan as well as old-timey stuff) acoustic bluegrass. Their latest album, ‘Find The One’, was produced by folk music genius John Wood (Nick Drake, Fairport Convention).

Weekend Ticket available for St George’s Bristol events (Saving £5).

Discount will apply automatically when tickets for both days are in the basket.

BAW

 

The Coal Porters – Wide Open Spaces (live)

 

Mud Morganfield – Son of the Seventh Son / Leave Me Alone

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Ben Pinnow conductor
Dylan Jones piano

City Voices Bristol are delighted to present ‘A Beautiful New Day’ – a wonderful mix of fun and uplifting songs from near and far, which are guaranteed to liven up any summer evening. Under the guidance of our new Musical Director – Ben Pinnow, we hope that you will join us for what promises to be a most entertaining evening.

We will be raising money for our nominated charity ALIVE! (Registered Charity No. 1132708). ALIVE! is a charity dedicated to improving the quality of life of older people in care.

cityvoicesbristol.com

 

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BAWban

BRISTOL AMERICANA WEEKEND
feat. Emmylou Harris & Rodney Crowell, Dan Penn & Spooner Oldham, Larkin Poe, Police Dog Hogan and more!

Saturday 11 – Sunday 12 July 2015    #bristolamericana

St George’s Bristol and Bristol Music Trust, the organisation that runs Colston Hall, are continuing to work in partnership to bring world class performing artists to the city – 2014 saw Phillip Glass play both venues and in 2015 Americana music will take centre stage! The line-up for their joint mini- festival presenting some of the best roots artists touring today has been announced. Americana has experienced a purple patch recently, with critically acclaimed concerts including Roseanne Cash, The Handsome Family and Gretchen Peters at St George’s Bristol, while Emmylou Harris performed her landmark album Wrecking Ball at Colston Hall last May and more recently the Hall welcomed the renowned Transatlantic Sessions for its Bristol debut. This year sees the flagship partnership between Bristol’s two Arts Council England funded music venues grow to take in a whole weekend of wonderful music – so squeeze on your denims, order a bourbon at the bar and kick back.

First stop the Bristol Americana Weekend LAUNCH EVENT at St George’s Bristol on Friday 27 March, soak up beautiful sounds from the States.

AMERICANA DOUBLE BILL: Kimmie Rhodes & Awna Teixeira (St George’s Bristol)

Friday 27 March 8pm
£16, £5 Students (limited availability) (plus fees)

Texan singer and songwriter Kimmie Rhodes, a regular duet partner with Willie Nelson, is country music royalty. Her fifteen albums include songs covered by Nelson – who has called her “an undiscovered superstar” – Emmylou Harris, Joe Ely, Trisha Yearwood, Waylon Jennings and Mark Knopfler. Tonight she appears in a trio, with the show opened by Po’ Girl’s Awna Teixeira, whose performance here a few years ago on a bill with the Carrivick Sisters was amazing. This very special date – followed by more music at a special after show party in the Crypt Bar by The Shrinks – marks the launch of the Bristol Americana Weekend taking place at St George’s and Colston Hall in July

SATURDAY 11 JULY

 7pm / £20 (plus fees)
GOODTIME SATURDAY DOUBLE BILL feat. Larkin Poe and Police Dog Hogan (St George’s Bristol)

Atlanta, Georgia’s Larkin Poe are a kicking Americana roots-rock band fronted by Rebecca and Megan Lovell, who with their sister Jessica performed as The Lovell Sisters before going on to work with Elvis Costello, Conor Oberst and T-Bone Burnett. Rebecca and Megan formed Larkin Poe – named after their ancestor, a cousin of Edgar Allan Poe – in 2010 and last year were voted ‘Best Discovery of Glastonbury’ by The Observer. They are going to be stars. The great value double-bill is opened by Guardian-readers’ favourites Police Dog Hogan a fabulously entertaining Americana/folk/bluegrass band whose banjo player/co-vocalist is Weekend columnist Tim Dowling. Their very collectable merchandise now includes tote-bags and t-shirts as well as tea- towels, and you can check their video for ‘West Country Boy’ here. Maverick magazine said: “This band are bloody good”.

7.30pm (Doors) / £13.50 (incl. booking fee)
JAMES HUNTER SIX (The Lantern at Colston Hall)

With a soulful tenor that recalls a host of R & B greats from Sam Cooke to Bobby Bland, Essex born James Hunter was introduced to fifties and sixties rock and blues by his Grandmother. Spotted by Van Morrison, he sent years as his backing artist before launching a successful solo career, and has since recognised the talents and loyalty of his own backing band by renaming them the James Hunter Six. Using strict tempos and lightning-quick switchbacks, the James Hunter Six’s songs have their roots in American soul music, with a hint of his British sense of humour in the homespun lyrics of romantic love and loss.

SUNDAY 12 JULY

3pm / £20 (plus fees)
BLUES & BLUEGRASS DOUBLE BILL feat. Mud Morganfield and The Coal Porters (St George’s Bristol)

Chicago blues singer and songwriter Mud Morganfield is the eldest son of legendary bluesman Muddy Waters. He’s recognised as one of the best, toughest and most authentic figures on the contemporary blues scene, mixing his own songs with classics from the traditional urban blues repertoire associated with his father. He’s appeared with Buddy Guy, Kim Wilson of the Fabulous Thunderbirds and actor/musician Hugh Laurie, and today is accompanied by his regular band of piano, harmonica, guitar, double bass and drums, as seen on ‘Later With Jools Holland’. The show is opened by The Coal Porters, ex-Long Ryder and country-rock luminary Sid Griffin’s “alternative” (they do David Bowie’s ‘Heroes’ and Bob Dylan as well as old-timey stuff) acoustic bluegrass. Their latest album, ‘Find The One’, was produced by folk music genius John Wood (Nick Drake, Fairport Convention).

7pm (Doors) / Tickets: £41.50, £36.50 (incl. booking fee)
An Evening With Emmylou Harris and Rodney Crowell (Colston Hall)

The acclaimed artists, long-time friends and Colston Hall favourites make a triumphant return to Bristol in support of their new album Old Yellow Moon. Emmylou and Rodney will perform material spanning their vast back catalogues, backed by a distinguished group of musicians including Steve Fishell, Jedd Hughes, Byron House, Gerry Roe and Chris Tuttle.

“There are legendary country singers, and then there’s Emmylou”  Time Out

7.30pm (Doors) / Tickets: £24.50 (incl. bf)
Dan Penn and Spooner Oldham (The Lantern at Colston Hall)

A legendary pairing. Spooner Oldham was part of the original house band that played on hundreds of hits that came out of the revered Muscle Shoals and in the famous FAME studios run by Rick Hall, including When A Man Loves a Woman and Mustang Sally. One of the great white soul singers of his generation, Dan Penn has written many of the greatest soul songs of the 60s, including Dark End of The Street and Cry Like A Baby.

All events go on sale on Friday 27 March!

Colston Hall Box Office 0844 887 1500 – www.colstonhall.org

7.5% Booking Fee (included)

St George’s Bristol Box Office 0845 40 24 001

£1 administration fee charged per transaction plus £1 card transaction fee & 70p postage where applicable

 

St George’s Americana Weekend Ticket

£35 (plus fees) for both Saturday and Sunday events at St George’s Bristol (saving £5). Box Office 0845 40 24 001

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JLWban

Julian Lloyd Webber, one of the world’s most influential classical musicians, was forced to step down from public performance in 2014 due to a neck injury. On Monday 11 May he visits St George’s for a special evening. Joined by his cellist wife Jiaxin Lloyd Webber and pianist Pam Chowhan, Julian will take his audience on an historical and musical journey, giving an insight into his extraordinary life.

Your show promises to be a kind of on stage autobiography. Tell us more about the format.

I’ll be telling stories and anecdotes of touring, recording sessions, concerts and TV shows to link with a new presentation of rare video footage of me talking and performing with people like Nigel Kennedy, Elton John, Katherine Jenkins, Tim Rice, Yehudi Menuhin, Joaquin Rodrigo, Cleo Laine, Stephane Grappelli and many others. Jaixin will illustrate by playing excerpts of music that have been important in my life including Faure’s Elegy, Andrew Lloyd Webber’s The Music of the Night and Rachmaninov’s Cello Sonata through to composers like William Lloyd Webber, Frank Bridge, JS Bach and Philip Glass. The format is deliberately fluid with lots of time for audience questions so it will vary every night. It’s suitable for all the family and I’d love people to bring their children because I can offer insight into what it’s really like to be on the road as a musician.

You played your final concert in Malvern. What did you take away from that night?

It was an extraordinary evening. I’d just made this recording of English Music for Strings with the English Chamber Orchestra and I knew that when it came to playing heavy, louder, physically taxing music on the cello I couldn’t do it anymore because I’d lost the power in my bowing arm. I knew I could get through the Malvern concert because I was only playing for a short time, but I realised that I wouldn’t be able to do what was planned subsequently so I had to call it a day. It was the most moving concert. The orchestra were wonderful to me and there was a great atmosphere in the hall. I was playing music I loved and the connection to Elgar and Malvern made it very special and strangely appropriate.

You’ve described stepping down from concerts as a bereavement. What has sustained you since then?

I was devastated because there were a lot of things I still wanted to do on the cello but it’s not the only thing in the world. I had a fantastic 40 years but I have to move on. I’m a positive person and I recognise that I’ve got something to contribute, particularly in the area of music education. I played so much all over the world and saw other systems in action and through the many musicians I’ve worked with I can offer young musicians career advice. Plus I’m conducting so I’m still making music.

For 40 years you practised the cello for four or five hours a day. After stepping down, you had banned yourself from playing completely but what is the situation now?

I play a little bit every morning because I don’t want to lose the skill which took me so long to build up. I still give masterclasses including one recently at Birmingham Conservatoire where I demonstrated a lot but I can’t go out and give public performances of major works.

As a cellist your work was all about moving people with music and hundreds of tributes speak of the solace and pleasure you’ve brought. What is it about music that is so special?

It has no barriers of any kind so it’s an incredibly direct means of expression. It’s very moving because often, you will have an musician interpreting the work of a composer to an audience so as the musician, you’re like a medium. There’s definitely a spiritual level to making music, particularly from the perspective of a classical performer but it’s true in other genres too. I’m a massive Buddy Holly fan and the way that he could communicate so directly with people was a fantastic gift.

With your brother Andrew, you belong to arguably the most influential musical dynasty of modern times. What was it about your upbringing that allowed such talent to flourish?

It was the most extraordinary background to grow up in because we took it for granted that there was music at every turn. My father was an organist and composer, my mother was a piano teacher and all the time there were these famous musicians drifting in and out. The concert pianist John Lill came to live with us and later on so did the lyricist, Tim Rice. There was no pressure to make music but we did take it for granted in that it was there and that’s why I’m so interested in music education. After all, if it hadn’t been available to me, who knows if Andrew and I would have discovered it? It’s why there should be systematic music education in this country. If we deny children opportunities we may miss out on a lot of talent.

What enabled you to tap into your creativity at such an early age?

It all evolved gradually. I started playing when I was four and I always enjoyed it but I didn’t take it seriously at all. The event that most changed that was the arrival of a young South African teacher, Rhuna Martin, who started taking me to hear great cellists in concert. It was way beyond the call of her duty but she must have seen something in me that she thought she could awaken.

So how did that alter your view?

It was such an eye opener for me. With role models, I suddenly realised what the cello could do as an instrument and the power it has. I’d always thought that it was the most vocal of instruments, and felt able to communicate through it which is why it appealed to me, but I owe it all to her. Again, it shows how important teachers are. She was a very special person; what she did changed my life.

You’re known as a man of drive and ambition. What would other people say about your approach to music that enabled you to excel?

I was never influenced too much by what other people thought or said. I enjoyed playing music and I loved the music that I believed in. I wasn’t someone who thought a classical musician should shut himself away from everyone. Going back through old video clips recently, I realised that I did a lot of light entertainment shows that the puritans thought were disgraceful. Even if I was playing a classical piece to the best of my ability, some thought it was the wrong outlet. I totally disagreed with that because I believe that music is for everyone. If I had a chance to play, say a Benjamin Britten piece on a TV show, I could reach millions of people who might not otherwise have heard it. To me that was very important. It’s depressing that children don’t generally see classical music on TV today. I’ve always wanted to bring the genre to a wider audience because if you love something you want to share it. It’s the thing I’ve most missed in the last year, going out on a platform and communicating with an audience.

What are the performances you’re most proud of?

Recording the Dvorak Cello Concerto in Prague with the Czech Philharmonic in the very hall in which it was premiered was special as was recording Elgar’s Cello Concerto with Yehudi Menuhin who had known Elgar so well. I also loved working with my wife recently as ‘Two Cellos.’’

Where are you heading now?

This series of concerts promises to be interesting but I’ll only do a tour like this once because it has elements that are retrospective and I want to do new things. I’m likely to conduct more and my first conducting CD is coming out in March. I’m also working with two charities, Sistema England and Live Music Now, both of which share the aim of transforming people’s lives through music.

Tell us more about Live Music Now.

It’s a terrific charity which was set up by my good friend and colleague Yehudi Menuhin who had the simple but brilliant idea to pay young musicians to go into hospices, care homes and SEN schools so it helps both ways. First, talented young musicians have a means to earn money at the start of their careers and they learn a lot about engaging with audiences. Second, they help the people they’re performing to. The charity now gives almost 3,000 performances a year.

You founded Sistema England which takes music to children in disadvantaged communities. How can music help education?

It works on many levels. First, it gives kids something completely different in their lives. It also teaches them a specific set of skills including co-ordination and self discipline which, once acquired, can be applied to other areas. Then you’ve got the sheer enjoyment factor so we often find that a project will raise school attendance rates. It’s also a great way of bringing staff and pupils together as playing music breaks down barriers. As I know from my story, music can change lives. My charity work is about raising awareness of the power it holds.

julianlloydwebber.com / sistemaengland.org.uk / livemusicnow.org.uk

An Evening with Julian Lloyd Webber

Monday 11 May, 7.30pm
Tickets £15, £12 (*plus fees)

BookNow

*£1 administration fee charged per transaction plus £1 card transaction fee & 70p postage where applicable


 

Thank you to Lisa Lambon (@LisaLambon) from Life in the Village for this interview.

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The Most Good You Can Do: How Effective Altruism is Changing Ideas about Living Ethically

Peter Singer presents the ideas behind a challenging new movement of people who want to live more altruistically, and to make sure that what they do has the greatest possible impact for good. He explains what ‘effective altruism’ is, how it is practiced, how its followers determine which causes to support, and offers a critique of traditional philanthropy. He shows that living altruistically often leads to a happier, more fulfilling life.

Peter Singer is often described as the world’s most influential living philosopher. In 2005 Time magazine named him one of the 100 most important people, and in 2013 he was third on the Gottlieb Duttweiler Institute’s ranking of Global Thought Leaders. Peter Singer first became well-known internationally after the publication of Animal Liberation in 1975. He is the author of more than twenty books including Practical Ethics, and The Life You Can Save.

ideasfestival.co.uk

(Photo: copyright Tony Phillips)

 

 

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A fabulous double bill of freaky folk from two of the most acclaimed acts to emerge from the golden age of UK acoustic music. Bridget St John recorded three delightfully husky-voiced albums for John Peel’s Dandelion label between 1969-1972 before signing for cult label Chrysalis. She then – like her much less famous contemporary Vashti Bunyan – temporarily retired from the public stage before re-emerging for a 1999 tribute-concert to Nick Drake (a friend, as were John Martyn and Kevin Ayers) in her adopted home city of New York. Michael Chapman, another John Peel favourite who recorded four albums for the legendary prog-folk label Harvest, is widely recognised as one of the most distinctive guitarists we have. Michael plays first, followed by Bridget, and they will share the stage for the final half hour or so.

“the best lady singer-songwriter in the country” John Peel on Bridget St John

“a superb guitarist…bluesy picking to Django-style swing and ragtime intricacies…” Glasgow Herald

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Naked at the Albert Hall: The Inside Story of Singing

In her bestselling autobiography Bedsit Disco Queen, Tracey Thorn recalled the highs and lows of a thirty-year career in pop music. But with the touring, recording and extraordinary anecdotes, there wasn’t time for an in-depth look at what she actually did for all those years: sing. She sang with warmth and emotional honesty, sometimes while battling acute stage-fright.

Part memoir, part wide-ranging exploration of the art, mechanics and spellbinding power of singing, Naked at the Albert Hall takes in Dusty Springfield, Dennis Potter and George Eliot; Auto-tune, the microphone and stage presence; The Streets and The X Factor. Thorn offers a unique, witty and sharply observed insider’s perspective on the exhilarating joy and occasional heartache of singing.

Tracey Thorn was singer and songwriter with Everything But the Girl from 1982 until 2000. At that point she semi-retired from the music business to bring up her children. She has since recorded three solo albums Out of the Woods, Love and Its Opposite, and Tinsel and Lights, and published her autobiography, Bedsit Disco Queen. In 2013, Thorn wrote and recorded the original music for The Falling, the debut feature film by filmmaker Carol Morley, which will be in cinemas from 24 April 2015. She lives in London with her husband Ben Watt, co-founder of Everything But The Girl, and their three children.

festivalofideas.co.uk

(Photo: copyright Edward Bishop)

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BasfWeb4

St George’s Bristol secures Heritage Lottery Fund grant

St George’s Bristol today announced it has secured initial support* for a £750,200 grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) as part of its current ‘Building a Sound Future’ appeal, a £5.5 million capital project to reconfigure and extend the world class music venue.

Development funding of £24,800 has also been awarded to help St George’s Bristol progress plans to apply for a full grant at a later date.

This new funding award will take the total raised for the ‘Building a Sound Future’ appeal to £3,500,000. This specific award from the HLF will be used to preserve, record and widen access to both the physical and cultural heritage of St George’s Bristol, a Grade II* listed venue, world renowned for its musical acoustics. This heritage project will help secure the long term future and financial sustainability of St George’s Bristol by:

  • Preserving its built heritage, reducing maintenance costs moving forward
  • Providing full access for all to the building for the first time
  • Re-configuring the crypt of the building to provide an engaging heritage interpretation space
  • Delivering a comprehensive plan of activity to engage current audiences and attract new visitors with the full heritage story of the historic building

Suzanne Rolt, Chief Executive, St George’s Bristol said: “We are delighted that the Heritage Lottery Fund has committed its support to our ‘Building a Sound Future’ project.

“The building was designed by Sir Robert Smirke, the architect of the British Museum, and has been an integral part of the community since 1823. Now with a worldwide reputation as a music venue with outstanding acoustics, the Heritage Lottery Fund’s support will secure our heritage and extend our physical access and reputation for both current and future generations.”

This award forms part of St George’s Bristol overall ‘Building a Sound Future’ capital development project which sees the construction of a brand new extension to the building on Great George Street, improving and extending the core facilities of the venue which already hosts some two-hundred live music events each year.

The fundraising appeal was kick-started by an initial pledge of £1.95 million from Arts Council England and reached the halfway point towards the end of 2014 following major grants from the Garfield Weston Foundation, the J.Paul Getty Jr. Charitable Trust and the Sir Siegmund Warburg’s Voluntary Settlement. This latest contribution will take the appeal a major step closer to reaching its final target by the end of 2015.

Nerys Watts, Head of Heritage Lottery Fund South West, said: “As well as being a beloved local landmark, St George’s Bristol played an important role in Bristol’s social history. We look forward to seeing the plans develop to make this heritage a prominent and integral part of the exciting development plans for the building.”

Eye-catching plans unveiled…

This week Patel Taylor, the award-winning architects designing the bold new contemporary glass and stone extension, also revealed full drawings and striking 3D CAD imagery of external and internal designs at a public event held at St George’s.

The drawings, some first sample examples of which are attached here, illustrate the bold and visionary design. The benefits the extension will deliver include:

  • A bold new contemporary extension to the core building, providing new visitor entrances
  • Remodelling of all backstage and artist facilities
  • New garden facing café and bar
  • New education and workshop spaces
  • New step free access directly into the main hall for the first time

Initial ground works for the construction of the new extension will begin in spring 2016, with St George’s Bristol remaining open throughout the majority of the build. Completion is scheduled for autumn 2017.

Further major public and private sources of funds are currently in active negotiation and any interested parties should contact Simon Farley, Head of Fundraising & Development at St George’s Bristol via email: s.farley@stgeorgesbristol.co.uk or by telephone: 0117 929 4929 x205

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In describing Henry Rollins, the tendency is to try to squeeze as many labels as possible into a single sentence. “Rollins is many things,” says the Washington Post, “diatribist, confessor, provocateur, humourist, even motivational speaker…his is an enthusiastic and engaging chatter.” Entertainment Weekly’s list includes “Punk Rock icon. Spoken word poet. Actor. Author. DJ. Is there anything this guy can’t do?” TV Guide has more concisely called him a “Renaissance Man” but if Henry Rollins could be reduced to a single word, that word would undoubtedly be “workaholic”. When he’s not traveling, Rollins prefers a to keep a relentless schedule full of work, with gigs as an actor, author, DJ, voice-over artist and TV show host to name a few of the roles that keep his schedule full.

Rollins has toured the world as a spoken word artist, as frontman for both Rollins Band and Black Flag and as a solitary traveler with insatiable curiosity, favouring road-less-traveled locales in places such as Nepal, Sri Lanka, Siberia, North Korea, South Sudan and Iran.

Henry currently hosts a weekly radio show on L.A.’s renowned NPR affiliate KCRW, in addition to writing weekly columns for the LA Weekly and Rolling Stone Australia. In 2013, after previously anchoring shows for IFC and National Geographic, Henry joined the History Channel’s H2 network as host of the TV show 10 Things You Don’t Know About. In 2014, Henry received the prestigious Ray Bradbury Creativity Award in recognition for his lifelong contribution to the arts, his passion for social activism, as well as his intense passion for the importance of maintaining books and libraries.

henryrollins.com